Friday, April 3, 2015

Friday - Caroline Clemmons is talking about Heroes, Heroines and Villains #MFRWauthor

1.      Do you write a single genre or do your fingers flow over the keys creating tales in many forms?

Most of my books are western historical romances but most also contain mystery, murder, or some form of mayhem. I love it when my fingers fly over the keys creating whichever story is my current WIP. I have also written two mysteries, a time travel, and several contemporary romances. All of my books are set in Texas.
Do your reading choices reflect your writing choices? Are there genres you wouldn’t attempt?
My reading choices are eclectic. The only genres I don’t read are horror, sci-fi, and true crime. I usually read western historical, but I also like general fiction such as Daniel Kalla’s FAR SIDE OF THE SKY, Susan Elia Macneal’s Maggie Hope series, and Sarah Addison Allan’s books.
 
2.      Heroes, Heroines, Villains. Which are your favorite to write? Does one of these come easy and why?
For some reason, spunky heroines are easier for me. I suppose that is because I can visualize myself as the heroine more easily than the other characters. I give some of the heroines those qualities and abilities I’ve always wanted. J At the same time, I enjoy writing heroes and villains.

When writing the hero, I visualize my husband (who I call Hero) and what he might do in the situation. Of course, I enhance him by making him younger than he is and more like he was when we became engaged. I also make him a little over the top ability-wise. After all, he IS the hero.

With a villain, I think of people who have caused a problem for my family or ancestors. Making a villain of someone I don’t like is easy. J. A. Jance gave me that idea when I heard her speak years ago. By the way, she is a funny speaker as well as a good author.

3Heroes. How do you find them? Do pictures, real life or plain imagination create the man you want every reader to love? Do they come before the plot or after you have the idea for the story?
 Luckily for me, the hero springs into my head fully formed. I see him as if he were in a movie in my head. My problem comes when searching for a stock photo to convey him on the book’s cover. Very seldom does the cover reflect exactly the image in my head. 
4. Heroines. How do you find them? Do pictures, real life or imagination create the woman you want the reader to root for? Do they appear before the plot or after you have the idea for the story?
 Heroines appear at the same time as the hero. Usually, I see a scene from the book playing out in my head. From there I plot the rest of the book. Sometimes that scene will be the opening, or it may be further into the book.
5. Villains or villainesses or an antagonist, since they don’t always have to be the bad guy or girl. They can be a person opposed to the hero’s or heroine’s obtaining their goal. How do you choose one? How do you make them human?
 First, a true villain has to be as strong as the hero and as smart. Other villains, like the one in the book I just released, might be insane and/or vindictive or some imagined or real slight. Gus Tucker, the primary villain in WINTER BRIDE, falls into this category. He’s wily and sly, and has slipped from mean to insane. To humanize him, he has to have a sympathetic characteristic. This is harder if he’s insane, but the WINTER BRIDE villain wants his son with him. In THE MOST UNSUITABLE WIFE, the insane villain wanted to protect his family name by keeping secret that he had half-sisters born out of wedlock. Of course, everyone knew about them, but the villain didn’t understand that fact.
6. What is your latest release? Who is the hero, heroine and or the villain?
 WINTER BRIDE is my latest release. Kendra Murdoch is the heroine, and she is the guardian of her nephew and two nieces, ages two to eight. Sheriff Butch Parrish is the hero and is determined to capture Gus Tucker and protect Kendra and the children. Gus lusts after Kendra and plans also to kill her and his daughters, but to take his son with him.
7. What are you working on now?
I’ve just begun THE IRISH TEXAN, a story of Finn O’Neill (a secondary character in THE TEXAN’S IRISH BRIDE). Because he needs money to purchase the ranch he wants, Finn agrees to work undercover in a Texas coal mine and discover who is sabotaging operations. He’s not a fan of working underground, which makes his job even more difficult. The heroine is feisty, intelligent Stella Clayton, who’s the daughter of a miner and who wants better things for her family than mining offers. There are multiple villains, so Finn is blocked from all sides. Since he’s the hero, we know he’ll be all right. J  
8. How can people find you?
            Website http://www.carolineclemmons.com
            Blog http://carolineclemmons.blogspot.com
I also blog at http://sweetheartsofthewest.blogspot.com on the 26th of each month and
            Twitter @CarolinClemmons (no E in Caroline)
            Facebook         https://www.facebook.com/authorcarolineclemmons





3 comments:

Caroline Clemmons said...

Thank you for hosting me today. Love the cat at the top. I have two cats and a dog. The one on your blog looks my late kitty who crossed over the rainbow bridge. I miss her.

Caroline Clemmons said...

Thank you for hosting me today. Love the cat at the top. I have two cats and a dog. The one on your blog looks my late kitty who crossed over the rainbow bridge. I miss her.

Janet Walters said...

Caroline, The cat in the picture was mine. Robespierry, a Maine Coon Cat. My son-in-law designed the cover so he used a photo.